PPD

#Stand4Moms

October was an exciting month for Postpartum Support Charleston. Just a few highlights: 

  • We reached out to the community, sharing our mission and resources with expecting and new moms.
  • Hosted support groups and walks all over Charleston.
  • Awarded four grants to moms seeking professional counseling.
  • And, to round out an incredible month serving moms, three members of our team attended peer support training in New Jersey with Bloom Maternal Wellness. The training gave us a new jumping off point to refocus our efforts and bring it back to where we know moms will benefit the most; peer support.

We are excited to announce that beginning January 2018, you will see peer support groups all over the tri-county area. We'll start by continuing and expanding the Summerville support group at the YMCA, and we'll add a Saturday support group at the Charleston Birth Place in North Charleston. We are fortunate to have such great support from these two community businesses.

In addition to our new support offerings, we are excited to launch our "Stand For Moms" campaign on November 6. We'll be selling T-shirts as a way for individuals to join our movement here in Charleston. By purchasing a T-shirt, you can show moms that you are standing with them and supporting them in their journey to becoming a new parent. 

We'll also highlight personal stories of struggles and triumphs from local moms and share why they #stand4moms. We'd love for you to join us and share your story on your Facebook page and tag us or send us an email and we'll feature you in an upcoming blog post. 

1 in 5 women will suffer from a perinatal mood and anxiety disorder, such as depression, anxiety, OCD or PTSD. That is approximately 950,000 women each year! These moms need us to Stand For Them! With this campaign, we aim to break down the stigma and show moms that this illness is common and with the right help and support it is temporary and treatable.

We Stand For Moms!

Pictured are members of the Postpartum Support Charleston staff and board at the Bloom Maternal Wellness peer support training. From left to right: Elaine, Katie and Amber are all survivors and they #stand4moms.

Pictured are members of the Postpartum Support Charleston staff and board at the Bloom Maternal Wellness peer support training. From left to right: Elaine, Katie and Amber are all survivors and they #stand4moms.

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ME TOO.

By: Graeme Seabrook.

To me those are the most powerful words in the English language. In any language, come to think of it.

When my son was born I lost myself. I became an angry, sensitive, anxious, scared, jumpy woman who tried to cover all of those feelings and who failed. I failed a lot.

Family and friends told me that they loved me. My mom told me that I was a great mother. She told everyone how great a mother I was. It made me feel like the biggest fraud on the planet.

My family told me exercise and fresh air would help.

My doctor told me that medication would help.

My therapist told me that talking about it would help.

I took walks, I took the pills and I spilled my secrets and I waited to feel better, to feel normal. And I did feel a little better, but I still felt so alone.

Then, one day I wrote a blog post about what I was going through. I wrote about the panic attacks when I tried to leave the house and the anger that seemed to come out of nowhere. I wrote about sleepless nights and how desperate I was to just enjoy my baby and how heavy the guilt was that I couldn’t. I clicked ‘Publish’ and I waited for the condemnation to roll in.

The first comment was simply two words on my Facebook page: Me too.

And I started to cry. I rocked and cried while the emails and comments and messages came in one after the other from moms who were going through the same thing, or who had gotten through it. That is when I really started to feel better.

METOOWe are, none of us, alone. About 950,000 of us will suffer from a maternal mental illness each year. That’s 1 in 5 moms. When you are struggling it can feel like you are all alone, but here’s the thing you need to know: Depression LIES. Anxiety? LIES. OCD? LIES!

There are so many moms just like you, and me. We are stronger when we are together, when we can look each other in the eye and say: Me too.

We would love to have you join us at one of the three support groups that we run in the Charleston area. Please click on this link for more information.

The Importance of Support

Great article in The Post and Courier today on PPD and highlighting the Moms' Run: Postpartum Depression: Information, a supportive community critical to helping women

When Sarah Moore’s husband pointedly asked her if she was having thoughts of hurting herself or her 2-month-old daughter, Moore could only nod.

“If he hadn’t asked me that, I wouldn’t have told him,” the West Ashley mom says.

Moore was trapped in a guilty spiral of worrisome thoughts that are common among women with postpartum depression, according to experts.

“I was super anxious. I would wake up in the morning with a knot in my stomach thinking about having to get through the day with her,” Moore says. “It’s not at all what I pictured it to be. I felt so guilty about that.”

While Moore felt she was the only woman to ever feel that way, an average of 15 percent of new moms experienced symptoms of postpartum depression between 2004 and ’08, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read the full story.